Perspective: What Do You See?

Airplane Through CloudsThings look much different from 30,000 feet in the air.

Some things are hard to see. Roads and rivers are small. You need a very sharp eye to make out swimming pools. And individual vehicles are definitely hard to distinguish, if not invisible.

But some things are much easier to see from this vantage point. The size of towns and cities, especially when they light up at night. The small size of hills compared to the whole landscape. Cloud-to-cloud lightening. How “shallow” most weather is.

Isn’t it that way with our lives? We so get easily myopic – near-sighted. Our little problems become magnified. The way someone commented – or didn’t – on Facebook. Forgetting a necessary item at the grocery store. Missing a deadline. Forgetting to pay a bill. The thoughtless way a friend neglected to call when you expected them to.

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Wisdom to Know the Difference

Child Looking at the Future“God is in control.”

What statement could be more spiritual, more mature than that?

Certainly God is in control. As the song says, “He’s got the whole world in His hands.” For many, that’s a matter of faith. I share that faith, and I’m glad that’s settled.

But is there anything God is NOT in control of?

That may sound sacreligious, and we’re not going to get overly theological here. But think about it: is God in control of YOU?

I’m not talking here about your eternal destiny: that’s another discussion. But think about it. Is God in control of what you had for dinner last night? How about what you said to your children yesterday? Or what time you came home from work? Or the balance on your credit card? Or how long it’s been since you had a date night with your spouse?

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Contraception, Health Insurance, and You

Oral Contraceptive PillsOne of the most controversial political battles recently has involved issues of health insurance coverage, gender issues, realities of economic disparity, and strong religious convictions. Also involved are questions of the role of government in lifestyle behaviors, and one’s hierarchy of moral values.

How’s that for a thorny problem? But is it really all that difficult?

At issue are the regulations put forth by the Obama administration in the enactment of the Affordable Care Act, and the mandate that every employer (with the exception of churches, synagogues, and such overtly religious bodies) provide health insurance that covers contraception for every enrollee without co-pay or other cost to them.

I’m an OB-Gyn physician. I’m a woman. I’m an ordained Christian minister. From which of these perspectives should I respond?

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It’s Not Just About Me

Teenager with an Attitude“I’m not hurting anyone but myself.” “It’s a victim-less crime.” “It doesn’t matter what I do: nobody cares.”

On the surface those statements may seem true, but they never are. Things we do, good and bad, affect others around us. We can’t help it.

We may have a hard enough time remembering that the things we do today affect US tomorrow:

  • The 15 minutes of exercise may not seem like much, but it adds up if I keep at it.
  • Charging that new outfit on my credit card may cost me three times as much by the time I pay it off.
  • Allowing myself to remain bitter over a past wrong will continue to poison my soul.

All those things are true. And the effect on my own future should be enough to push me to make good decisions today – to live healthy, care for my family, and nurture my relationship with God.

It may be a little harder to see the impact of my daily decisions on other people. But whoever said “No man is an island” was right.

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Caregivers Need Care Too

CaregiverMore than 5 million Americans currently suffer with Alzheimer’s disease. And about 15 million Americans are involved in caregiving for someone with dementia. The direct medical costs for this disease just this year are estimated at over $200 billion. And unless something changes, these costs will increase to over $1.1 trillion by 2050. These are just a few of the facts and figures provided by the Alzheimer’s Association for this year.

No cure is presently available for Alzheimer’s disease, perhaps because by the time symptoms begin it may be “too late” for any available treatment to help. A team of researchers is preparing to test an experimental medication on members of a Columbian family with a high rate of early Alzheimer’s BEFORE they develop the disease, in the hopes that treatment before the disease manifests itself may prove effective in prevention. If true, this may prove revolutionary in giving hope for the millions of others at risk for the disease.

For the families of those with Alzheimer’s or other dementia, caregiving can be overwhelming. There is no way you can do it alone.

A few resources that can help:

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